Trauma

When Trauma in a person's life is not attended to, it spreads like a rain storm starting in one area and spreading outward until it envelopes you this includes unpredictable emotions, flashbacks, strained relationships and even physical symptoms like headaches or nausea. While these feelings are normal, some people have difficulty moving on with their lives.  In any case trauma leaves its imprint on the brain.

    The most common reactions is that after a trauma it can feel like we have 99 problems—I'm scared, I can't sleep, I'm on edge, I'm angry, etc.—and recognizing that all of these problems are tied to the trauma can make them feel more manageable: Maybe what I'm experiencing is one problem with many faces. It can also be useful to realize that as the recovery process unfolds, these experiences are likely to improve, which can instill hope.

  So what are some o ...

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  • From the desk of the Chaplain

The volatile (and sometimes destructive) emotions associated with ADHD

The volatile (and sometimes destructive) emotions associated with ADHD can manifest in frustration, sensitivity, or tendency to depression. Here’s why — and what you should know to control them.

BY WILLIAM DODSON, M.D., AND ARI TUCKMAN, Psy.D., MBA

Fact: People with ADHD feel emotions more intensely than do people without the condition. We don’t just get happy — we go over the moon; and when something bad happens, we’re devastated. For someone with ADHD, feelings can be big, scary monsters; they often seem to come out of nowhere, and we often feel powerless in our ability to manage them. In his book Emotional Intelligence, Daniel Goleman coined the phrase “amygdala hijacking,” referring to the ability of primitive parts of the ADHD brain to pre-empt the cortex, or thinking brain. When powerful emotions take over, there is no thinking going on. Trying to hold it all in or stuf ...

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  • From the desk of the Chaplain

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